Caregivers

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It was a gradual and progressive situation where I became the caregiver of my father. He was given a diagnosis probably about a year-and-a-half ago of Alzheimer's dementia, and it was something that we recognized over, you know, a long period of time that he was becoming more and more forgetful and so when they actually put a diagnosis on the situation, it was kind of a shocking revelation.

Transcript

Caregivers

Caregivers

By the Caregiver: It was a gradual and progressive situation where I became the caregiver of my father. He was given a diagnosis probably about a year-and-a-half ago of Alzheimer's dementia, and it was something that we recognized over, you know, a long period of time that he was becoming more and more forgetful and so when they actually put a diagnosis on the situation, it was kind of a shocking revelation.

Alzheimer's dementia actually is a progressive disease; although, it can be controlled with medications. There's different degrees of severity, and my father probably about a year ago seemed to be in a more severe state than he actually is now. He suffered from, you know, some anxiety, a lot of fears, and just especially fear of being alone.

As a child, you never really know exactly when that transition is going to come. It's not inevitable, but in terms of making that transition from being child to caregiver, it was really just second nature that that was something that I I had to do, was my responsibility. My father has been living with me probably for the last two years. He's expressed the fact that he feels much more comfortable and better actually just being, you know, in the environment of his family as opposed to trying to live on his own. It's really been a, you know, a blessing for me to be able to see, you know, that he's he's doing well.

He's capable of doing a lot of the activities that he did before. He's capable of continuing to participate in his senior athletics. He's the current national record holder in four track and field events for the National Senior Games Association. He set national records for the 100 meter, 200 meter, 400 meter, and the long jump, so he's he's able to get back into those activities and participate. I'm just actually happy that he's out there competing. I'm proud to see him him do that. There aren't many 84-year-olds that can actually, you know, do what he does.

By the Crowd: Good running there, Young Man.

The Runner: Thank you.

By the Crowd: Keep up the good work.

By the Caregiver: Obviously, you know, we're not happy that he wasn't able to live on his own and that he's developed some forgetfulness, but at the same time, he's there with us physically every day, so, you know, if you look on the positive side, you know, there's there's always a there's always a positive side to every situation.